Book Review: Bang by Mike Faricy

A delicious mix of hard-boiled P.I. story, endearing revelation, and a thriller that’ll have you re-checking the locks on your doors. And, of course, in inevitable Dev fashion, Dev’s services aid a luscious beauty who repays his kindness.

Bang gives us a peek at the young Devlin Haskell, before he got to be “that rascal, Dev Haskell”. Truth to tell, we learn that at thirteen he was already a rascal, and exactly how it could have been so much worse! We also meet some creepy characters who’ll find their full expression and come back to haunt our dreams in The Corridor Man series.

Dev Haskell is juggling a shoestring P.I. operation and a long string of Miss Right Nows when his junior high school nightmare walks into his office. It seems the neighborhood bullies have grown up, served their prison time, and resurfaced under the cloak of newfound respectability with bigger threats than taking Dev’s lunch money.

Goodreads

My Review

I chose to read this novella after receiving a free e-copy from the author. You can get a free copy as well at Goodreads! All opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased.

Dev Haskell is one of those P.I.s you can’t help but like. He’s a womanizer but he’s smart and he has contacts for just about anything…whether they’re willing to help him or not. When a bully from his past needs his help to find someone, those old feelings come up but he realizes he’s an adult now and won’t let be bullied anymore. Good for him! He does agree to look for the old friend, but does he really want to find him?

This novella is short but still has a good story. The best part is that it introduced me to a new author and a new character and I’m definitely going to have to find some time to read the novels about Dev Haskell!

About the Author

I was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, I still live there as well as in Dublin, Ireland. I’ve been a soldier, freelance journalist, tended bar, sold designer cakes, owned a painting and decorating company along with a number of other schemes and scams. If that doesn’t offend you I also play bagpipes with the Brian Boru Irish Pipe Band. All my books stand alone, read them in whatever order you wish. They are filled with the sort of oddballs we are all curious about, but wisely, prefer to keep at a distance. None of my characters will be saving the world from terrorism, international banking conspiracies or coups to take over the government. Rather, they inhabit a world just below the surface of polite society, characters with one foot on either side of the law. The circumstances they find themselves in are usually due to bad decisions, but bad decisions lead to interesting stories. They serve not so much as an example but as a warning to us all. Thanks for taking the time, happy reading.

Book Review: Will You Give Me Your Toy? by Abigail Faure

Max the Fox wants to have all the toys in the forest. He doesn’t like to share his own things and takes others’ toys. When everyone turns away from the little fox cub, he starts thinking of what’s going on. Will Max solve the issue? Which way will he choose? And finally, will he find friends among animals whose toys he took?

This is an educational and inspirational book on manners and mannerisms for little kids, starring animals we are excited about. 3-5-year old children are just at the age when they need to develop communication skills. This is the age when one needs to learn considering not only their own desires, but also the needs of others.

You might enjoy the book even in an older age thanks to an evergreen social story and bright cute illustrations. You will meet friends and foes, animals nobody loves and ones who impress everyone, and make sure – friendship is magic! Even adults should realize these basic truths for children’s sake.

Take this adventure together with Max – one of the foxes kids who wants to get friends like these cute little animals in the Green forest.

What’s more, the book contains an entertaining bonus – an extra game for attentive kids. 😉

Amazon

My Review

I chose to read this book after receiving a free e-copy from the author. All opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased.

Max is a cute little fox who has a lot of toys but he doesn’t want to share them. In fact, he hoards everyone else’s toys as well. He soon realizes that it’s not so fun to have all those toys when you can’t play with them with others.

The lesson of sharing is so important! Will You Give Me Your Toy? is a good way to help teach children about sharing. It also has cute illustrations with bright colors that will keep a young child’s attention. This would definitely be a good addition to a child’s library.

About the Author

The youngest from five children, a little dreamer, and future tales author grew up in the town of Ellsworth, Maine. She started her career by telling stories to her neighbors and friends, then started writing them on paper. Next, Abigail tried herself as a journalist and after almost eight years of a successful career decided to switch to her hobby.

The main reason for that was her family – husband and two daughters with whom she lives in Portland now. They have two adopted cats, so animals and children are the main characters of Abby’s books.

Abigail considers her main mission to make this world more kind and comfortable for everyone. She believes that kindness should be nurtured from the very childhood. So, books are the way to convey this bright thought to even the youngest kids.

Book Review: Keeping the Lights on for Ike by Rebecca Daniels

Keeping the Lights On for Ike by Rebecca Daniels

Publisher:  Sunbury Press, February 2019
Category: Memoir, History, Military, WWII, and Biography

ISBN:  978-1620061145
Available in Print and ebook, 284 pages

Daily Life of a Utilities Engineer at AFHQ in Europe During WWII; or, What to Say in Letters Home When You’re Not Allowed to Write about the War

Most people don’t realize that during the war in Europe in the 1940s, it took an average of six support soldiers to make the work of four combat soldiers possible. Most of what’s available in the literature tends toward combat narratives, and yet the support soldiers had complex and unique experiences as well. This book is based on personal correspondence, and it is primarily a memoir that creates a picture of the day-to-day realities of an individual soldier told in his own words [as much as he could tell under the wartime rules of censorship, that is] as well as giving insight into what it was actually like to be an American soldier during WWII.

It explores the experiences of a non-combat Army utilities engineer working in a combat zone during the war in Europe and takes the protagonist from basic training through various overseas assignments—in this case to England, North Africa, and Italy as a support soldier under Eisenhower and his successors at Allied Force Headquarters. It also includes some reflections about his life after returning to Oregon when the war was over.

The soldier involved is Captain Harold Alec Daniels [OSU, Class of 1939, ROTC] and most of the letters were written to his wife, Mary Daniels [attended U of O in the late 1930s]. They are the author’s parents, and she inherited the letter collection, photos, and all other primary source materials after her mother’s death in 2006.

Amazon
Barnes&Noble
Powell’s
Indiebound
Sunbury

Guest Review by Laura Lee

The author of this book, Rebecca Daniels dedicated it to both of her parents and I can’t think of a more fitting tribute to two people who led such extraordinary lives.
In the 1930’s, two people, a man and a woman lived in the same town and attended the same high school without ever meeting each other. The two did not meet until college, when Alec, a reserved and quiet engineering student and Mary, a journalism major who longed to be a mother one day, were set up on a blind date by a mutual friend.

But, of course, every good story has to have a little heartbreak, and shortly after the pair were married, the United States entered World War II. Like so many men during that time, Alec was drafted into the war. But, rather than being sent to the front lines, he was sent to a position in a support troop. Being an electrical engineer and a member of the ROTC meant that Alec had a special set of skills that were best used in one of the many troops that provided support to the combat soldiers on the front lines of the war.

These troops covered things like administrative, logistical and infrastructure duties that made it so the soldiers in the trenches had an easier time staying alive. It’s a seldom talked about aspect of the war effort, and one that Rebecca Daniels covers beautifully not just from the perspective of a daughter but, through the usage of letters and cards between her parents from that time, from the perspective of Alec himself. Though Alec was not able to discuss much about his whereabouts or his work in the letters that he sent home to his new wife, his love for Mary was clear and it is through these letters that the narrative gains a very sweet and humanizing element.

I highly recommend this incredibly touching read! You can’t go wrong with this one! I give it 5 stars, more if I could.

Praise for Keeping the Lights on for Ike

“The book moves swiftly along, while at the same time capturing the frustration of their prolonged separation. The historical timeline provides just the right bit of historical context to these war years behind at the tail of the army. This is not the typical WWII combat book.”- The Montague Reporter

“The lack of military detail — the focus on everyday life and on the relationship between Alec and Mary — ends up being one of the book’s greatest assets. Many works of history detail the story of great battles. Fewer dwell on individual wartime experiences.  The book is also strengthened by the affection expressed in Alec’s relatively inarticulate yet moving letters to his wife on the home front.”- Tinky Weisblat, Greenfield Recorder, author of “The Pudding Hollow Cookbook,” “Pulling Taffy,” and “Love, Laughter, and Rhubarb”

“Carefully researched history and a beautiful remembrance of one soldier’s letters home. A poignant and personal look into the lives of two very private people and an extraordinary first hand example of why it’s called the Greatest Generation. In detail and in truly first class research one is left with the sense that they know these two people very well. Not only is this a well written historical account of World War II, it is a touching and gentle love story from a remarkable author with a most deft touch and turn. Got five stars from me. So worth it.”-W. Richards, Amazon

“This book made me feel almost like I was right there with Alec and Mary as they experienced that time of their lives. My parents, being the same age, also had a similar experience and I thought of them as I read every word. The author cleverly brought to life their story and for that I shall be forever grateful.”- Sunbury Press Reader Review

About the Author

Rebecca Daniels has been a university professor for many years who has also simultaneously had a vital creative career in the theatre. Throughout her career, her work has always been a mix of performance, teaching, and her own writing.

Her groundbreaking book on women directors and the effects of gender on their work is currently still in print [Women Stage Directors Speak: Exploring the Effects of Gender on Their Work, McFarland, 1996], and she has been published in several theatre-related professional journals over the years as well. After her retirement in the summer of 2015, she was finally able to focus all her energies on this book.

Website:  https://rebecca-daniels.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rebecca.daniels.9

Giveaway

This giveaway is for 1 print copy open to Canada and the U.S. only. There are also 2 pdf copies open worldwide. There will be 3 winners. This giveaway ends August 1, 2020,midnight pacific time. Entries are accepted via Rafflecopter only.

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Teddy Rose Book Reviews Plus June 12 Kick off & Excerpt

Miller Amazon June 15 Review

Lu Ann Rockin’ Book Reviews June 16 Review & Guest Post

Dino Goodreads June 17 Review

Bee Book Pleasures June 18 Review

Waqas  Goodreads June 19 Review

Am Goodreads June 22 Reviewe

Betty Toots Book Reviews June 23 Review & Interview

Linda Lu Goodreads June 24 Review

Jas International Book Promotion June 25 Review

Bookgirl Goodreads June 26 Review

Gud Reader Goodreads June 29 Review

Amy Locks, Hooks and Books June 30 Review & Excerpt

Michelle Reading Authors Network July 6

Dawn Bound 4 Escape July 10 Guest Review

Dee Donadees Corner July 15 Review

Teddy Rose Book Reviews Plus July 17 Review

Kathleen Celticlady’s Reviews July 20 Guest Review  & Excerpt

Amber Imaginative Mama’s Dragonfly July 28 Review & Excerpt

Mindy Room Without Books is Empty July 29 Review

Danielle Urban Book Reviews July 31 Review & Guest Post

Book Review: Space Academy by Hannah Hopkins

It’s the year 2100. Earth is dying. A young woman, Elsie, has risked everything to get her newborn son, Will, aboard ‘The Mayflower’ – a spaceship that will transport a select number of people to a new planet they can call home. Elsie’s luck takes a turn when she discovers the captain of ‘The Mayflower’ is an old friend. He allows her to board with her son, giving them a place on the luxurious Floor One, where they live amongst the most honoured of ‘The Mayflower’s’ passengers.

Thirteen years later, and Will is ready to start school at Space Academy, an institute specialising in subjects such as Alien Studies, Technology, and Rocket Control. While a pupil there, Will starts to uncover secrets about his father’s death, becoming wrapped in a mystery that he and his friends must solve if they are to have any hope of saving humanity from the threat that lies in wait.

Lose yourself in this brilliantly addictive novel as it takes you on a journey through the stars. But be warned – you might be surprised by what you find.

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Space-Academy-Hannah-Hopkins-ebook/dp/B0883G654X

US – https://www.amazon.com/Space-Academy-Hannah-Hopkins-ebook/dp/B0883G654X

My Review

I chose to read this book after receiving a free e-copy. All opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased.

Space Academy has some good ideas, but there’s so much left unsaid. There is mention of a war and something about the AIs rebelling, but not much else except that people had to leave Earth. There is a ship named The Mayflower that the characters are from, but at some point other ships are mentioned. I was a bit confused.

The story about Will and his friends is a good one. They end up having a strong bond by the end of the school year after going through so much together.

Although I enjoyed the story about Will and friends, I was left with many questions such as how the Space Academy was able to be a clear bubble and never get damaged, how the rocket races worked inside The Mayflower, why robots were still being used if there was a rebellion, and so much more. If there are more books in this series, I’ll be tempted to read them to see if any of these questions are answered.

About the Author

In 2017, Hannah Hopkins released a self-published novel entitled ‘The Split’; the story of four teenagers navigating life after Earth as they journey through space to a new planet. Two years later, the book was picked up by ‘The Conrad Press’ and re-vamped as ‘Space Academy,’ with a new cover, new title and new additions to the story. ‘Space Academy’ was released in 2020, kickstarting Hannah’s career as a writer.

 Hannah is currently busy writing a historical fiction novel with a feminist twist. She spends the rest of her time working at a University and caring for her two young children in the UK.

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/hannahhopkinsauthor

https://www.instagram.com/hhopkins94/

https://www.hannahhopkinsauthor.co.uk

Book Review: I Feel Angry by Aleks Harrison

Are you looking for a book that will help your kids manage their emotions better, pick up essential social skills and recognize anger in a healthy and positive way?

Anger is one of the most difficult emotions for children to manage. More often than not, a book is the best way if you want to teach kids how to handle their emotions and manage anger. This book is a practical guide for parents who want their kids to have better emotional health. 

My Review

I chose to read this book after receiving a free e-copy from the author. All opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased.

Max feels the telltale signs of anger when his dad says it’s time to leave the playground, when he’s tying his shoes, and when he’s at school. Each time, his dad (or his teacher) helps him to deal with that anger in different ways. Whether it’s by deep breathing, doing something else, or counting backwards, the suggestions work for Max and would work for most kids.

I Feel Angry not only has good suggestions for helping children deal with their anger, it also is presented in rhymes, and the illustrations are bright and colorful. The rhyming and illustrations will keep the attention of children. Books like this one are great. They are not only books that children want to read, but they teach as well.

About the Author

Aleks Harrison is a father of two children and the author of a series of children’s books about emotions and self-regulation methods. Alex writes books that help parents and teachers raise attentive, socially, and emotionally aware children.

The author collaborates with the best illustrators who help create exciting, fun, and inspiring books for children of all ages and their parents.


To contact the author, write to the following e-mail address: aleksharrisonwriter@gmail.com.