Tag Archives: Middle East

Book Review & Giveaway: Drone Strike by Joe Giordano

22 Apr

Book Title: Drone Strike: An Anthony Provati Thriller by Joe Giordano
Category: Adult Fiction, 290 pages
Genre: Thriller
Publisher: Rogue Phoenix Press
Release date: April 15, 2019

Content Rating: PG-13 + M (for graphic violent terrorist scenes, no sex, no f-words.)

 

Book Description:

Karim’s family is killed by a U.S. drone strike in Iraq, collateral damage. The Islamic State in the Levant exploits his rage, recruiting him for a terrorist attack on the U.S., and only Anthony Provati can stop him. Drone Strike takes you on a fast-paced adventure across the Mediterranean, into Mexico, finally arriving in the States. Drone Strike explores the psychological realities that seduce Karim to commit an act of terror, includes a love story between Moslem Karim and Miriam, a Christian woman he defends in Turkey and highlights the plight of Middle Eastern and Central American refugees.

To read reviews, please follow Joe Giordano’s page on Italy Book Tours.

Buy the Book:

 

 

 

My Review

I chose to read this book after receiving a free e-copy. All opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased.

Drone Strike is a timely thriller that deals with terrorism. It’s not only the story of Anthony Provati tracking Karim down but how Karim became the man he is. An American drone kills his beloved family which causes him to go down a road of terror. The way that terrorist organizations are able to recruit and train people, taking advantage of people like Karim, is something that is realistic and a major problem that needs to be addressed somehow.

If you like realistic action-packed thrillers, Drone Strike is a good one, especially if you want to learn more about the cultures and situation in the Middle East.

 

Meet the Author:

As a former International Executive Vice President of 3M, Joe Giordano’s experience included running a business in the Middle East out of Athens, Greece. Born in New York, he’s had first-hand experience with the cultures and most of the locations in Drone Strike.

Joe’s stories have appeared in more than one hundred magazines including The Saturday Evening Post and Shenandoah. His novels, Birds of Passage: An Italian Immigrant Coming of Age Story (2015) and Appointment with ISIL: An Anthony Provati Thriller (2017) were published by Harvard Square Editions. Read the first chapters and sign up for his blog at http://joe-giordano.com/

Joe was among one hundred Italian-American authors honored by Barnes & Noble Chairman Len Riggio to march in the 2017 Manhattan, Columbus Day Parade.

Connect with the author: Website ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Pinterest

 

 

Enter the Giveaway!

Ends May 3, 2019

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

 

Advertisements

Review: Jumper by Jeff LaFerney

2 Jul

   

7-1-2013 9-56-33 PMTitle: Jumper (Time Travelers)

Author:  Jeff LaFerney

Genre:  Time Travel

Publisher:  Tower Publications

Publication Date:  April 2013

Description: After spending three years in jail and several years completely alone, twenty-four-year-old Cole Flint discovers an amazing ability—he can time-travel and teleport. He’s a jumper. So what should the motorcycle-riding, cage-fighting tough guy do? He should protect an innocent eighteen-year-old girl who happens to be in possession of the Staff of Moses. Following the direction of a trio of angels who are determined to shake things up in the Middle East, Cole pairs up with Hannah Carpenter and her pet grizzly while he also tries to change his past and learn the mystery of his birth. Curiously, the King of Jordan knows all about Hannah, and he’s determined to gain possession of the staff. He’ll do anything to possess its power, but is it possible that he’s no more than a pawn, manipulated in time along with Cole and Hannah? Jumper is a mysterious roller coaster of action and a time-traveling adventure that will keep readers guessing right to the very last page.

Review:

 This is the second book I’ve read by Jeff LaFerney and I do enjoy his writing. He has the gift of getting you interested from the beginning and keeping you engaged in the book throughout. There were so many ways this book could have ended so I had to keep reading to find out which direction it went and why Hannah and Cole were given the gifts that they had been given. Much of the story was predictable but there were also a couple surprises which is always nice.

The time travel is done well. The title of each chapter tells what day it is in relation to gaining possession of the staff so you always know where in time the story is. I did have trouble understanding one aspect of the time travel near the end of the book but I don’t want to give anything away so I can’t go into it any further than that. I reread one chapter 3 times and was still confused.

Both Hannah and Cole are likeable. I didn’t really care for the way the relationships were handled by Cole but, in retrospect, he acted more like a real person than most heroes in novels so I have to say, “Well done!”

There were times in the book that it went more in-depth than I care for, such as when Middle East politics were described or at the beginning when the complete narrative of the tour guide at Mount Nebo was included. This is just a personal preference and I’m sure many people enjoy the in-depth descriptions. I tend to skip over them. I’ve been known to skip pages of descriptions in some of James Michener’s books.

I definitely recommend this book and I’m looking forward to the next one in the series.

Available on Barnes and Noble.

%d bloggers like this: